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Dentist Albert Lea MN

You truly realize you’re away from home when you experience a dental emergency and have to find a dentist on your own. Don’t wait for this to happen and take proactive action on your oral health. Don’t think just because you’re in college you can avoid teeth cleaning sessions. Ask around and get dentist referrals from the people around you. Here you will find useful tips that will help you find the right dentist away from home. Please scroll down for more information and access to the experienced dentists in Albert Lea, MN listed below.

Padmaja Koya Mutyala, DDS
Albert Lea, MN
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
Erik John Bohrnstedt, DDS
(507) 373-4141
723 Marshall St
Albert Lea, MN
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
Steven K Bland, DDS
(507) 373-5350
1206 W Front St
Albert Lea, MN
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
Daniel S Schoeneman, DDS
(507) 373-3323
PO Box 1225
Albert Lea, MN
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
Steven J Poeschl, DDS
(507) 874-3662
PO Box 37 186 Washington Ave
Alden, MN
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
George Robert Lundstrom, DDS
(507) 377-1659
209 N 9th Ave
Albert Lea, MN
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
A David Flor, DDS
(507) 377-5033
PO Box 36
Albert Lea, MN
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
Craig A Hoffman, DDS
(507) 373-3323
146 W Clark St
Albert Lea, MN
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
Dr.Steven Poeschl
(507) 874-3662
186 Washington Ave
Alden, MN
Gender
M
Speciality
Dentist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Craig Clayton Clausen, DDS
(507) 373-4698
134 W Main St
Ellendale, MN
Specialties
General Dentistry

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Choosing a Great Dentist

By Karen Keller

Dental dilemmas aren’t usually the stuff of existential crises—that is, until you feel a shooting pain from a tooth or gum area and think you're going to die…and then you remember that the family dentist is back with

, well, the family.

To avoid dental emergencies and to get that yearly cleaning that you agree to every three years, you need a good dentist nearby. Here’s how to find one.

Get a Decent Referral

1) Ask for referrals from coworkers, family, friends, or neighbors. Be sure to ask these questions:

  • Does the dentist run on time?
  • How many dental chairs does the dentist run at same time? Should be two or fewer.
  • Fair fees?
  • Courteous?
  • Not much soreness afterward?

2) Ask a local periodontist (they do gums, not teeth) or a local dental lab (“fixed prostheses”/ones who make crowns/bridges) owner who their personal dentist is. Ask them to give you a couple alternatives, too. Then call other periodontists/lab owners and see which dentists get the most hits. Use the yellow pages or Google to find them. No need to act sketchy—just say you're new in the area, and you’re looking to find a decent dentist.

3) Try calling a dentist and asking flat out which dental lab they use. Then call that lab and ask the owner if the dentist’s work is up to snuff.

Vet the Referred Dentist

Avoid malpractice. Call the state board of consumer affairs and ask if there are any records of actions against the dentist. Has the dentist’s license ever been revoked or suspended? Google a dentist’s name and see what comes up. If lawsuits surface, it’s probably not a good sign.

Be skeptical of the referral source. Think twice about asking an old dentist for a referral. He’ll probably just give you the number of his golf buddy.

Also check out dentist ratings at Dr. Oogle by searching a specific dentist’s name. Or plug in a zip code to see referrals on Find a Dentist .

As a last resort, check out the zip code search for dentists at the American Dentistry Association or Dentists.com .

Grill the Potential Dentist

The following questions asked to a dentist or their receptionist may help decide who is worthy of holding a drill two inches from your face:

  • Is this the dentist’s practice or does someone else own it? If they’re an owner or co-owner, chances are they’re more invested in their work and reputation.
  • How long has the dentist been practicing? Don’t sign up with a new dentist. It takes more than two years for a good dentist to really know what he's doing.

Red Flags

Dentists these days sometimes “over-treat” to make more money, just like a mechanic says you need to replace the brake pads when they’re in fine working condition.

Get a second opinion if:

  • You haven’t had a filling in years, yet the dentist insists you need several fillings. (Bear in mind that he could be right.)
  • The dentist says you need to replace your silver fillings wi...

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