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Retirement Planning Services Gardnerville NV

It’s never too early to start your retirement planning. The sooner you start the more money you collect. It’s important to look for quality jobs that have benefits packages you can take full advantage of. A 401(k) is a retirement plan set up by employers that allows employees to defer or invest a portion of their income, pre-tax, to their retirement plan. Here you’ll find useful retirement tips that will definitely help you with your retirement planning. Please scroll down for more information and access to the retirement financial advisors in Gardnerville, NV listed below that can explain more and even get you started on your retirement savings.

Ron Lee Bankofier, CFP®
(775) 782-9102
1389 Lampe Ln # 2
Gardnerville, NV
Firm
Edward Jones
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Education Planning, Estate Planning, Insurance Planning, Long-Term Care, Retirement Income Management
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Service Professionals

Data Provided By:
Mr. Donovan Troy Jackson, CFP®
(775) 782-5061
1701 County Rd Ste O
Minden, NV
Firm
Waddell & Reed
Areas of Specialization
Comprehensive Financial Planning, Education Planning, Insurance Planning, Investment Management, Long-Term Care, Retirement Income Management, Retirement Planning
Key Considerations
Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Self-Employed Business Owners

Data Provided By:
Mr. Robert D. Blackman, CFP®
(775) 782-3795
PO Box 457
Minden, NV
Firm
Independent Planning Group Ltd
Areas of Specialization
Accounting, Asset Allocation, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Education Planning, Employee and Employer Plan Benefits, Estate Planning, General Financial Planning

Data Provided By:
Mr. Richard P. Dee, CFP®
(607) 382-7780
PO Box 366
Zephyr Cove, NV
Firm
Lake Tahoe Wealth Management, LLC
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Business Succession Planning, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Education Planning, Estate Planning, Intergenerational Planning, Life Transitions
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $1,000,001 - $5,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Medical/Dental Professionals

Data Provided By:
Mr. James Patrick Moultrup, CFP®
(775) 829-7779
PO Box 12489
Zephyr Cove, NV
Firm
Moultrup Financial

Data Provided By:
Mr. David James Brady, CFP®
(775) 782-3950
1625 State Route 88 Ste 202
Minden, NV
Firm
Brady & Associates
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000



Data Provided By:
Mr. Jeffery L. Whitaker, CFP®
(775) 782-5061
1701 County Rd
Minden, NV
Firm
Waddell & Reed

Data Provided By:
Ms. Mary K Metzger, CFP®
(775) 783-4756
PO Box 497
Genoa, NV
Firm
Wells Fargo Advisors, LLC
Areas of Specialization
Estate Planning, Investment Planning, Retirement Planning
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $1,000,001 - $5,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided By:
Mr. Gerald D. Klosterboer, CFP®
(775) 588-6116
295 Highway 50
Zephyr Cove, NV
Firm
First Allied Securities

Data Provided By:
Mr. Warren J. Dankert, CFP®
(775) 741-5302
3668 green acres dr
carson city, NV
Firm
SELF EMPLOYED
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Comprehensive Financial Planning, General Financial Planning, Investment Management, Retirement Income Management, Retirement Planning

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Investing in 401(k)s and IRAs

By Christopher Stella

So it’s the first day of work and HR asks whether or not you want to open up a 401(k) retirement account. “Heaven’s to Betsy” you say in your most petulant grandfatherly voice: why the hell do I need a retirement account? Ahh…so you say that now. But what happens when you’re 50 years old and realize that had you contributed a measly $100 a month to an account earning a reasonably conservative 6% interest rate, you could have been sitting on a cool $120,000. Not exactly a chunk of change to shake a cane at. But there’s more. Firstly, each of those piddly $100 contributions is tax free, meaning that had you not deposited them into the account, you would have only received about $60 to spend. Secondly, your employer (depending on their level of altruism) will frequently match those contributions up to a certain amount (usually between $1,000 and $2,000 a year). So now you’re talking close to a quarter of a million dollars, half of which was free!!!! Alright, so there’s a little more to it than that, but that’s the basic gist.

Statistics show that you need about 75% of your pre-retirement income to maintain a similar standard of living. So if you're making $150,000 a year, retire at 60, and stick around until you're 90, you'll need to save over $3,000,000. Here's are two easy ways you can make you can make that happen.

What’s a 401(k)?

A 401(k) is a retirement plan set up by employers that allows employees to defer (or invest) a portion of their income, pre-tax, to their plan. For example, if you make $45,000 a year, and contribute $2,000 to our 401(k), then you will only be taxed on $43,000 of your salary at the end of the year. Taxes on $2,000 are paid later when you take out the money during retirement. So why bother contributing?

A 401(k) is like a savings account on steroids. Because your deferral is pre-tax, it means you have more money to contribute, and a larger account grows faster. Further, employers often “match” or contribute a percentage of your deferral as well.

But don’t think that this is just some cash give-away-free-for-all. There are rules. First, the money can’t be withdrawn before the age of 59.5, unless there is an extenuating circumstance, such as serious financial hardship or disability. Otherwise, early withdrawals are subject to a 10% penalty, paid to the IRS. However, if you need to withdraw the money, as a result of the tax deferment on interest, the penalty isn’t significant. If your employer is also matching your funds, then the penalty is negligible.

The maximum current amount that can be invested each year is $15,000, as stated by the IRS. However, that number changes pretty regularly so check with your employer to figure out what the exact numbers are. But what if you leave your job? Well, it doesn’t really matter. You get to keep everything you’ve put in your account plus whatever portion of the money your employer has matched. And there are no penalt...

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